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Home / Hinduism Perspective / Hymn XXIX Sivapuranam Arut Pathu The Decad Of Grace Or ‘Cleansing From Delusion.’ Translation in English

Hymn XXIX Sivapuranam Arut Pathu The Decad Of Grace Or ‘Cleansing From Delusion.’ Translation in English

The T.V.U.P states that this was one of the earliest of the Sage’s poems, and that it was sung at Tiru-perun-turrai. It certainly bears the impress of youth, and in many respects is inferior to some of his later poems. It is said to have for its subject the purification of the soul from the great delusion (Maha-maya). What this is can only be known by a careful study of the Caiva Siddhanta philosophy.

The metre is the same as in XXII, and is very sweet. In each stanza, the two latter lines nearly correspond throughout the whole poem, an epithet or two being changed. Civan is addressed as the god who appeared in the Triclinia (Kuruntham) grove near Tiru-perun-turrai, and about thirty different epithets are applied to him, some of which are mere repetitions. The epithets applied to Tiru-perun-turrai are also varied. The last line in each stanza contains a Telugu phrase equivalent to ‘and what is that’? so that the line literally reads: ‘Save Thou in grace, saying “what is that”? or in other words, ‘What is there to fear? fear not.’ The poet is complaining of the power of earthborn delusions, and prays the god to take away his anxious fears. I cannot trace any sequence in the thought from stanza to stanza.

In the Siddhanta, very great stress is laid upon the idea that all embodiment, while it is painful and to be got rid of as soon as possible, is yet a gracious appointment of Civan, wrought out through Cakti, for the salvation of the human soul through the destruction of deeds, which are the root of all evil to mankind. Now the Buddhist formula represents suffering as being the whole account of the matter: ‘Birth is suffering, old age is suffering, sickness is suffering, death is suffering. The origin of suffering is the thirst for pleasure, being, and power. The extinction of this thirst brings about the extinction of suffering.’ The Caiva Siddhanta doctrine, on the contrary, gives to life and sufering a real significance. The present life is a probation,- a purgatory,- a preparation for endless fellowship and communion with the Supreme. Thus Grace is recognised where the Buddhist sees only suffering; and the instrument of man’s release is that wisdom which understands the divine purpose, and adapts itself to that purpose. Our Sage dwells much upon the value of prayer, and of humble worship paid to the divine guru, while in Buddhism all is to be done by unaided human effort. At every point the two systems are in directest opposition!
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1)
O Light! O Lamp girt with effulgent beams!-

the dame with curling locks and beauteous form
Is Thine, Supreme, Who wear’st the milk-white ash!

The Just, Whom Ayan of the flower knew not,
Nor Mal! In happy Perun-turrai Thou

‘neath the Kuruntham’s flow’ry shade didst rest.
Great First of Beings! when I craving call,

BID THOU IN GRACE THY SERVANT’S FEARS BEGONE! || 4 ||

2)
O Dancer! Spotless One! O ash-besmear’d!

Thy brow hath central eye! Lord of heaven’s host!
Sole Deity! through all the world Thyself

I sought lamenting loud, but found Thee not.
Thou, Who by Perun-turrai’s pleasant lake

‘neath the Kuruntham’s flow’ry shade didst rest.
Great Source of Being! when Thy servant craving calls,

BID THOU IN GRACE THY SERVANT’S FEARS BEGONE! || 8 ||

3)
Our Leader! Ruler of my life and soul!

Whom ladies twain, with perfum’d flowing locks,
Claim as their Spouse! Lord of the firy eye!

Whose glance caus’d sudden fire from Dakshan’s frame to spring,
And goodly Kaman’s too! In sacred Perun-turrai Thou

‘neath the Kuruntham’s flow’ry shade didst rest.
Great Anganan! when I Thy servant craving call,

BID THOU IN GRACE THY SERVANT’S FEARS BEGONE! || 12 ||

4)
The Lotus-god, the four-fac’d, Kannan too,

dark as the azure sky, could not approach
Thee, Pure One! when They pray’d Thee to shine forth,

Father! thou wert as mighty flame display’d.
In Veda-echoing Perun-turrai Thou

‘neath the Kuruntham’s flow’ry shade didst rest.
Great Being spotless! when Thy servant craving calls,

BID THOU IN GRACE THY SERVANT’S FEARS BEGONE! || 16 ||

5)
[These two lines are not translatable!]
………………………………………………………………………….

……………………………………………………………….
……………………………………………………………………………

……………………………………………………………..
Thou, Who in Perun-turrai’s sylvan groves

‘neath the Kuruntham’s flow’ry shade didst rest.
O Teacher glorious! when Thy servant craving calls,

BID THOU IN GRACE THY SERVANT’S FEARS BEGONE! || 20 ||

6)
O Happy One and Pure! Thou like to gem

whose radiant beams ‘mid pure white ashes shine!
In mind of those who think of Thee Thou giv’st

sweetness intense. Thou rare Ambrosia, Who
In sacred Perun-turrai’s home of Vedic lore

‘neath the Kurunthanm’s flow’ry shade didst rest.
O Father glorious! when Thy servant craving calls,

BID THOU IN GRACE THY SERVANT’S FEARS BEGONE! || 24 ||

7)
Thou True One changing oft Thy form; Meru Thy bow,

Thy foemen’s cities three Thy HAND consumed!
Thy FOOT burnt up death’s king! O ruddy One,

Whose FORM was as a fiery column seen!
Thou, Who in Perun-turrai’s happy home

‘neath the Kuruntham’s flow’ry shade didst rest.
O glorious Teacher! when Thy servant craving calls,

BID THOU IN GRACE THY SERVANT’S FEARS BEGONE! || 28 ||

8)

The Free, the First, the Triple-eyed, the Sage,-

Thou giv’st the heavenly goal to those,
Who off’ring flowers with clustering buds adore,

devoutly pondering praise; consummate One,
Thou, Who in Perun-turrai’s happy home

‘neath the Kuruntham’s flow’ry shade didst rest.
O Sire, all glorious! when Thy servant craving calls,

BID THOU IN GRACE THY SERVANT’S FEARS BEGONE! || 32 ||

9)
Regarding me distraught, Thou bad’st confusion cease,

destroying thought of this world and the next,
Thou very God, Thou Holy One, upon Thy crest

the swelling lustrous snake and Ganga bide.
Thou, Who in Perun-turrai’s home of lucid Vedic lore

‘neath the Kuruntham’s flow’ry shade didst rest.
Glorious in mercy! when Thy servant craving calls,

BID THOU IN GRACE THY SERVANT’S FEARS BEGONE! || 36 ||

10)
In Perun-turrai girt with ordered stately groves,

‘neath the Kuruntham’s flow’ry shade,
I call to mind Thy glories all, and pondering yearn,

and as my mighty Lord Thee oft invoke
Ascetic rare! when I, Thy servant, craving call,

struggling amid the billowy sea,
In grace declare the fitting path to reach

the silver hill, and BID ME COME! || 40 ||

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